31 years ago today - George Brett and the ‘Pine Tar Incident’
Art by Aaron Hadley Dana
Riding with Legends

"I shined shoes outside the Hotel Somerset. The doorman was from South Boston, and he let one kid from Southie work the front every year. I was that kid for a few years.

Ted Williams lived at the Somerset, and the Yankees also stayed there when they came to town. One afternoon, the Yankees all were coming down from their rooms, heading to Fenway. They were waiting out front for cabs. I got a piece of paper and an old pen, and I went up to a couple of the players and asked for their autographs. The pen didn’t work!

Jerry Coleman reaches into his suit jacket and takes out a gold pen. He signs and hands the pen to someone else and someone else, and now Joe DiMaggio is there. For some reason, he thinks I’m Jerry Coleman’s nephew or something, and he smiles and takes the gold pen and signs.

While he’s signing, Ted Williams comes down. He comes over to Joe and me. He takes the gold pen and signs. They’re talking, Ted Williams and Joe DiMaggio, how are ya, back and forth, and for some reason Williams thinks that I’m DiMaggio’s nephew or something. He says, ‘Hey it’s getting late. Let’s go to the ballpark.’ We get into the cab, Ted Williams, Joe DiMaggio, and me. I leave my shoeshine box right on the street because that would be a giveaway, ya know?

I ride in the middle of the backseat. I have Joe DiMaggio on one side of me. I have Ted Williams on the other side. I have both of their autographs. And I also have Jerry Coleman’s gold pen in my pocket. Who ever has made out better than this? Williams and DiMaggio figure it out by the time we get to Fenway that I’m nobody’s nephew, but for that short time…”

~Raymond Flynn, Mayor of Boston from 1984-1993.
Excerpted from Leigh Montville’s Ted Williams: The Biography of an American Hero.

Happy Birthday to Billy Martin. He’d be 86 today.
"Billy was a true Yankee — one of the truest ever. He always said he wanted to die a Yankee. He was his own man. He was fiery and could be charming. He was a great manager." ~ Bucky Dent

Happy Birthday to Billy Martin. He’d be 86 today.

"Billy was a true Yankee — one of the truest ever. He always said he wanted to die a Yankee. He was his own man. He was fiery and could be charming. He was a great manager." ~ Bucky Dent

This, America, is why you should care about the Minor Leagues. 

The Philadelphia Phillies Triple-A team, the Leigh High IronPigs, just announced their new jerseys and hats. This is the most genius way for a ball club to make a ton of money on merchandise.

Talk about bringing home the bacon. 

Koji Uehara’s commercial for Suntory, a Japanese premium beer.

If only there was English subtitles. Can anyone translate?

The Stratton Story (1949)
Monty Stratton was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Chicago White Sox from 1934-1938. His career was cut short following the closure of the 1938 season when he accidentally shot his leg with a holstered pistol while hunting. The wound was severe enough to require his leg to need immediate amputation. 
After his accident, Stratton would try and teach himself to pitch with the artificial leg (he also tried enlisting when World War II started but was turned away). He’d experiment by pitching to his wife Ethel. 
The Stratton Story (1949), starring James Stewart and June Allyson detailed his life and efforts to return to baseball. Gene Bearden, Bill Dickey and Jimmy Dykes all made cameo appearances in the film.
(Stratton is less known for giving up a homerun to Lefty Lefebvre during his first Major League at bat. It was the first time in history a player hit a home run on the first swing of his first Major League at bat. Later, Lefebvre would joke with Stratton, “You were so embarrassed, giving up a home run to me, you shot yourself.”)

The Stratton Story (1949)

Monty Stratton was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Chicago White Sox from 1934-1938. His career was cut short following the closure of the 1938 season when he accidentally shot his leg with a holstered pistol while hunting. The wound was severe enough to require his leg to need immediate amputation. 

After his accident, Stratton would try and teach himself to pitch with the artificial leg (he also tried enlisting when World War II started but was turned away). He’d experiment by pitching to his wife Ethel. 

The Stratton Story (1949), starring James Stewart and June Allyson detailed his life and efforts to return to baseball. Gene Bearden, Bill Dickey and Jimmy Dykes all made cameo appearances in the film.

(Stratton is less known for giving up a homerun to Lefty Lefebvre during his first Major League at bat. It was the first time in history a player hit a home run on the first swing of his first Major League at bat. Later, Lefebvre would joke with Stratton, “You were so embarrassed, giving up a home run to me, you shot yourself.”)

mightyflynn:

Harold Ramis
August 24, 2006
Wrigley Field
Chicago, Illinois
Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty

mightyflynn:

Harold Ramis

August 24, 2006

Wrigley Field

Chicago, Illinois

Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty

Ted Williams’ ‘Cuckoo’ Eating Habits

"He was loud. We sat down at the counter. He said he wanted a chicken sandwich and a frappe. The sandwich came and he started smelling it. He said, loud voice, ‘Is this chicken fresh?’ The owner came over and told him it was. Jesus Christ, it was embarrassing. Ted smelled the chicken some more. He’d say things a nine-year-old kid wouldn’t say. No control at all. Anyway, he eats the sandwich, drinks the frappe in about a minute, and says we’re out of there. I’ve got three quarters of a sandwich still to go.

We go from there to another sandwich shop. It happens all over again! He orders the same thing, a chicken sandwich and a frappe. He says the same thing. Is this chicken fresh? He starts smelling the chicken. Eats the sandwich, drinks the frappe in a minute, and says we have to go. I’d been to two restaurants, seen him eat two meals, and I still hadn’t eaten a whole sandwich.

He was just cuckoo.”

~ Lefty Lefebvre, taken from Leigh Montville’s Ted Williams: The Biography of an American Hero.

1958 Topps Mickey Mantle #150

1968 Topps Roberto Clemente #150

1956 Topps Duke Snider #150

This is Between the Basepaths’ 150th post. Thanks for the support, the reblogs, the likes and the follows. Here’s to hoping the next 150 come quicker than a Randy Johnson fastball.